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WHAT IS OUR MISSION STATEMENT

As we prepared for our CQC visit we felt it was important to stop and think about what our purpose is, what we are providing for all our patients and what we would like in return in order to run a safe, effective, caring, responsive and well led surgery.

Mission statement

Each of our patients matters to us!

Our promise to our patient is to:

v Treat you with respect and courtesy at all times

v Provide you with advice and treatment in a timely manner

v Help you make decisions about your health.

v Treat you as an equal and with dignity at all times

v Discuss your treatment with experts and refer you when necessary

v Guide you through the health and social services

v Ensure we maintain confidentiality with what we discuss and keeping your records secure and safe.

v Keep up to date with development in health care by continuing to learn and ensure our staff are trained to optimum levels to provide you with high levels of care and support

v Treat you with compassion and to enhance your care while you are with us

In return we ask you the patient to:

v Keep your appointments and let us know if you cannot attend an appointment

v Use the out of hour’s service only for an urgent medical condition which cannot wait until the next working day

v Be courteous to our staff who do the best they can for you. “Please” and “Thank you” would be the perfect way to support them

v Talk to us about complaints, suggestions, compliments to ensure we can develop as a surgery.

Patients

We will use this mission statement to reflect upon on a regular basis to maintain a high standard of care. 

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Posted by on January 22, 2015 in Training and Advice

 

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WE HAVE SURVIVED A CQC INSPECTION!

On January 10th 2013 The surgery at 102 The Avenue as a service provider were registered by the Care Quality Commission under the Health and Social Care Act 2008.

  • CQC

We were aware that one day we would be having an inspection and since that time we have been working together to improve the environment, train our staff, formulate policies such as how to act in the event of a fire, bomb alert, infection control, staff employment, needle stick injury etc

Initially, when inspections were performed they seemed intrusive and a negative experience and were heavily criticised. We faced the thought of an inspection with fear and intrepidation so that during this time we have been working hard to meet the requirements.

Subsequently, they have set out a new vision and direction for the Care Quality Commission in their Strategy for 2013- 2016, raising standards and putting people first and in their recent consultation ‘A new start’, which proposes radical changes to the way they regulate health and social care services. The changes were developed with extensive engagement with the public, CQC staff, providers and key organisations. They has  been strong support for the introduction of Chief Inspectors; expert inspection teams; ratings to help people choose care; a focus on highlighting good practice; and a commitment to listen better to the views and experiences of people who use services. They also claim there is strong support for the new framework, principles and operating model that they will use, which include the five key questions they will ask of services:

Are they safe?

 Are they effective?

Are they caring?

Are they responsive?

Are they well-led?

Two weeks ago we were informed that the day had arrived for our inspection. On Tuesday January 20th  3 inspectors arrived, a GP, a retired Nurse Practitioner and an Administrator greeted by both doctors : firstly , I was asked to give a summary of what I felt we did best and they listened intently, making notes. Following this they sat together to formulate a plan of action and then soon after infiltrated the surgery individually talking to all members of staff and patients who attended by request but also to patients waiting to be seen by clinicians. The atmosphere in the surgery remained calm and they remained unobtrusive. The staff were interviewed but still continued to deal with patients in their usual caring, efficient manner. We, as doctors were fired with numerous questions from their prompt sheets as were Mary, our practice nurse and Sangeeta, the practice manager.

At the end of the day Dr Livingston and myself were summoned to their presence and we are very pleased to say that the overall assessment was extremely favourable except for a few minor comments, such as the fact that patients did not know how to complain ( despite the fact that is written on out practice leaflet and on our website) hence we need a poster!

Also, had we thought of installing a defibrillator ?

We want to express our heart- felt thanks to all our loyal staff, who always work hard and deliver an excellent service to our patients and this was noticed by the inspectors. Also, a thank you to those patients who showed their support by talking to the inspectors on the day or writing positive comments on the CQC cards.

Thank you

The final completed report will be available in about two months time and will be posted on the following website

http://www.cqc.org.uk/content/doctorsgps

 
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Posted by on January 21, 2015 in Training and Advice

 

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THE DAY HAS ARRIVED!!!

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Primary care plays a vital role in our health and social care system. Good primary care can play a significant role in improving the quality of people’s lives, including those of the older people; people with long-term conditions; new mothers; children and young people and people with mental health issues. We as GP’s nwork with others in the health and social care system to keep people well and are a trusted source of information and advice, often being the first port of call for those in need of care. Crucially, we are the central coordination point for the care of people who move between hospitals, care homes, care in the home and community health services.j

Dr Livingston and myself are passionate about our work as GP’s and between us have worked for >60 years in Prima.ry Care. At 102 The Avenue we have a dedicated, multidisciplinary team who are keen to provide high quality personal health care, attending to our patients needs by acting with integrity and complete confidentiality in a courteous, approachable, amicable and accommodating manner.  We are always willing not only to accept praise but also constructive criticism so that our service remains patient centred. All members of our team are committed to participating in ongoing training and learning to maintain an up to date high standard of care. We particate in events with other Primary Health Care Teams in our network and Commisioning Group so that we can remain in tune with what is happening in the local and national scene and benefit from initiatives that may improve services for our patients.

imageThe Care Quality Commission is the independent regulator of health and adult social care in England.

They have set out a new vision and direction for the Care Quality Commission in their Strategy for 2013- 2016, Raising standards and putting people first and in their recent consultation A new start, which proposes radical changes to the way they regulate health and social care services.

                             We have been randomly selected to undergo an inspection on Tuesday

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*A team of inspectors will spend a day at the surgery and during that time will interview the staff and a selection of patients.

* They will also read comments which patients will have completed on specific cards available at the surgery prior to the inspection.

The five key questions they need to ask and obtain evidence from many sources including directly from patients are:-

Is the quality of care

* SAFE?

* EFFECTIVE?

* CARING?

* RESPONSIVE?

further information : http://www.cqc.org.uk

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The overall table of events:-

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We have registered with the CQC – We are now await an inspection

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Now we are one of the registered practises and we are awaiting inspection. As you may be aware most of the questions will be directed towards patients and staff to establish what they think of the service provided.
Many of us are aware there have been problems with the CQC in their reporting of problems in various hospitals. This is the first year that they have looked at Primary care services and GP’s.This is rather strange for older GP’s as for the most part have always thought of their practise territory as a private domain.Inspections only started in 2005 in a structured manner and they were carried out internally. Independent inspections are probably long overdue particularly for some seriously underachieving practises.We sincerely hope that there will be some constructive criticism but also trust that what we do well will be recognised.
As there were some patients who want to know what is happening I felt it was important to keep you up to date and there may be someone out there who will be asked at 48hrs notice to come along to talk with the inspectors.
Meanwhile,
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The outcomes that will be looked at are as below
Outcome 1: Respecting and involving people who use services
People should be treated with respect, involved in discussions about their care and treatment and able to influence how the service is run.
Outcome 2: Consent to care and treatment
Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it.
Outcome 4: Care and welfare of people who use services
People should get safe and appropriate care that meets their needs and supports their rights.
(Outcome 5: Meeting nutritional needs
Food and drink should meet people’s individual dietary needs.)
Outcome 6: Cooperating with other providers
People should get safe and coordinated care when they move between different services.
Outcome 7: Safeguarding people who use services from abuse
People should be protected from abuse and staff should respect their human rights.
Outcome 8: Cleanliness and infection control
People should be cared for in a clean environment and protected from the risk of infection.
Outcome 9: Management of medicines
People should be given the medicines they need when they need them, and in a safe way.
Outcome 10: Safety and suitability of premises
People should be cared for in safe and accessible surroundings that support their health and welfare.
Outcome 11: Safety, availability and suitability of equipment
People should be safe from harm from unsafe or unsuitable equipment.
Outcome 12: Requirements relating to workers
People should be cared for by staff who are properly qualified and able to do their job.
Outcome 13: Staffing
There should be enough members of staff to keep people safe and meet their health and welfare needs.
Outcome 14: Supporting workers
Staff should be properly trained and supervised, and have the chance to develop and improve their skills.
Outcome 16: Assessing and monitoring the quality of service provision
The service should have quality checking systems to manage risks and assure the health, welfare and safety of people who receive care.
Outcome 17: Complaints
People should have their complaints listened to and acted on properly.
Outcome 21: Records
People’s personal records, including medical records, should be accurate and kept safe and confidential.
Outcome 3: Fees
People who pay for a service should know how much they have to pay, when and how to pay it, and what they will get for the amount paid.
Outcome 15: Statement of purpose
People know that CQC is kept informed of the services being provided.
Outcome 18: Notification of death of a person who uses services
People can be confident that deaths of people who use services are reported to CQC so that, if necessary, action can be taken.
Outcome 19: Notification of death or unauthorised absence of a person who is detained or liable to be detained under the Mental Health Act 1983
People who are detained under the Mental Health Act can be confident that important events that affect their health, welfare and safety are reported to CQC so that, if necessary, action can be taken.
Outcome 20: Notification of other incidents
People who use services can be confident that important events that affect their health, welfare and safety are reported to CQC so that, if necessary, action can be taken.
Outcome 22: Requirements where the service provider is an individual or partnership
People have their needs met because services are provided by people who are of good character, fit for their role, and have the necessary qualifications, skills and experience.
Outcome 23: Requirement where the service provider is a body other than a partnership
People have their needs met because services are managed by people who are of good character, fit for their role, and have the necessary qualifications, skills and experience.
Outcome 24: Requirements relating to registered managers
People have their needs met because services have registered managers who are of good character, fit for their role, and have the necessary qualifications, skills and experience.
Outcome 25: Registered person: training
People have their needs met because services are led by a competent person who undertakes the appropriate training.
Outcome 26: Financial position
People can be confident that the provider has the financial resources needed to provide safe and appropriate services.
Outcome 27: Notifications – notice of absence
People can be confident that, if the person in charge of the service is away, it will continue to be properly managed.
Outcome 28: Notifications – notice of changes
People can be confident that, if there are changes to the service, its quality and safety will not be affected.

Sangeeta Kathuria,our practise manager is working very hard to look at these outcomes in order to be as compliant as possible. Some of them may not be easily achievable but I have every confidence that under her direction we will be very near the mark.

Watch a video of Professor David Haslam explaining how they will check that we meet the essential standards. Please note: Prof Haslam is no longer our national advisor but has taken up a role as Chair of NICE.

Posted by Dr Bayer

 
 

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