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We have registered with the CQC – We are now await an inspection

22 Jun

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Now we are one of the registered practises and we are awaiting inspection. As you may be aware most of the questions will be directed towards patients and staff to establish what they think of the service provided.
Many of us are aware there have been problems with the CQC in their reporting of problems in various hospitals. This is the first year that they have looked at Primary care services and GP’s.This is rather strange for older GP’s as for the most part have always thought of their practise territory as a private domain.Inspections only started in 2005 in a structured manner and they were carried out internally. Independent inspections are probably long overdue particularly for some seriously underachieving practises.We sincerely hope that there will be some constructive criticism but also trust that what we do well will be recognised.
As there were some patients who want to know what is happening I felt it was important to keep you up to date and there may be someone out there who will be asked at 48hrs notice to come along to talk with the inspectors.
Meanwhile,
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The outcomes that will be looked at are as below
Outcome 1: Respecting and involving people who use services
People should be treated with respect, involved in discussions about their care and treatment and able to influence how the service is run.
Outcome 2: Consent to care and treatment
Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it.
Outcome 4: Care and welfare of people who use services
People should get safe and appropriate care that meets their needs and supports their rights.
(Outcome 5: Meeting nutritional needs
Food and drink should meet people’s individual dietary needs.)
Outcome 6: Cooperating with other providers
People should get safe and coordinated care when they move between different services.
Outcome 7: Safeguarding people who use services from abuse
People should be protected from abuse and staff should respect their human rights.
Outcome 8: Cleanliness and infection control
People should be cared for in a clean environment and protected from the risk of infection.
Outcome 9: Management of medicines
People should be given the medicines they need when they need them, and in a safe way.
Outcome 10: Safety and suitability of premises
People should be cared for in safe and accessible surroundings that support their health and welfare.
Outcome 11: Safety, availability and suitability of equipment
People should be safe from harm from unsafe or unsuitable equipment.
Outcome 12: Requirements relating to workers
People should be cared for by staff who are properly qualified and able to do their job.
Outcome 13: Staffing
There should be enough members of staff to keep people safe and meet their health and welfare needs.
Outcome 14: Supporting workers
Staff should be properly trained and supervised, and have the chance to develop and improve their skills.
Outcome 16: Assessing and monitoring the quality of service provision
The service should have quality checking systems to manage risks and assure the health, welfare and safety of people who receive care.
Outcome 17: Complaints
People should have their complaints listened to and acted on properly.
Outcome 21: Records
People’s personal records, including medical records, should be accurate and kept safe and confidential.
Outcome 3: Fees
People who pay for a service should know how much they have to pay, when and how to pay it, and what they will get for the amount paid.
Outcome 15: Statement of purpose
People know that CQC is kept informed of the services being provided.
Outcome 18: Notification of death of a person who uses services
People can be confident that deaths of people who use services are reported to CQC so that, if necessary, action can be taken.
Outcome 19: Notification of death or unauthorised absence of a person who is detained or liable to be detained under the Mental Health Act 1983
People who are detained under the Mental Health Act can be confident that important events that affect their health, welfare and safety are reported to CQC so that, if necessary, action can be taken.
Outcome 20: Notification of other incidents
People who use services can be confident that important events that affect their health, welfare and safety are reported to CQC so that, if necessary, action can be taken.
Outcome 22: Requirements where the service provider is an individual or partnership
People have their needs met because services are provided by people who are of good character, fit for their role, and have the necessary qualifications, skills and experience.
Outcome 23: Requirement where the service provider is a body other than a partnership
People have their needs met because services are managed by people who are of good character, fit for their role, and have the necessary qualifications, skills and experience.
Outcome 24: Requirements relating to registered managers
People have their needs met because services have registered managers who are of good character, fit for their role, and have the necessary qualifications, skills and experience.
Outcome 25: Registered person: training
People have their needs met because services are led by a competent person who undertakes the appropriate training.
Outcome 26: Financial position
People can be confident that the provider has the financial resources needed to provide safe and appropriate services.
Outcome 27: Notifications – notice of absence
People can be confident that, if the person in charge of the service is away, it will continue to be properly managed.
Outcome 28: Notifications – notice of changes
People can be confident that, if there are changes to the service, its quality and safety will not be affected.

Sangeeta Kathuria,our practise manager is working very hard to look at these outcomes in order to be as compliant as possible. Some of them may not be easily achievable but I have every confidence that under her direction we will be very near the mark.

Watch a video of Professor David Haslam explaining how they will check that we meet the essential standards. Please note: Prof Haslam is no longer our national advisor but has taken up a role as Chair of NICE.

Posted by Dr Bayer

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